It was my sec­ond time par­tic­i­pat­ing in the solar oven work­shops, and the first work­shop in round two of the series, but actu­al­ly work­shop num­ber 4 so far in total. As long as we are all clear now…

Where the first work­shop was gen­er­al infor­ma­tion and data col­lec­tion, this work­shop was the hands-on ses­sion. The women received their solar ovens, instruc­tions on set­up and usage, and then cooked a dish that they had brought ready to go into the oven. We had sev­er­al types of rice, beans, at least two pota­to dish­es, a cou­ple of veg­eta­bles, pas­ta, a dessert com­pote, and two cakes. It turns out the cook­ing rice in the solar oven is the most chal­leng­ing. It is a tricky bal­ance between amount of liq­uid and time. Items cooked in the solar oven require less liq­uid than con­ven­tion­al­ly cooked items, but they take longer. Beans just take a long time so they weren’t ready for lunch, but every­thing else turned out very well. The lemon cake was prob­a­bly the most pop­u­lar, but that might have also been because it was fin­ished right as a group of kids were com­ing home from school for lunch.

As usu­al, kudos to Sarah for her excel­lent man­age­ment of the project and work­shop lead­er­ship. It is such a great expe­ri­ence work­ing with her and this project.