Since I don’t real­ly count Tulum, this was day 2 with Mayan ruins. I wasn’t expect­ing much from Chichen Itza, even with its won­der-of-the-world sta­tus, but I was pleas­ant­ly sur­prised. It was inter­est­ing — not that we took a tour. So, you will have to excuse the lack of infor­ma­tion in the pic­ture cap­tions, because I know not what I am look­ing at specif­i­cal­ly. I mean, they are all ruins right?

chichen-itza-pano
chichen-itza-4
chichen-itza-5
chichen-itza-6
chichen-itza-7
chichen-itza-8
chichen-itza-1
chichen-itza-2
chichen-itza-9
chichen-itza-11
chichen-itza-12
chichen-itza-13
chichen-itza-14
chichen-itza-10

The big pyra­mid in all it’s ear­ly morn­ing glo­ry, plus a bit of con­struc­tion.

This side is a mess… it’s ruined!!! haha­ha­ha­ha

Col­umn mad­ness

Ancient Mayan tic-tac-toe

More columns

I detect some greek influ­ence here as well.

The clas­sic shot

beau­ti­ful stone col­or

The ball court

skulls, skulls, skulls

mmmm, a fresh one.

Mayan igua­na knows all the secrets to the uni­verse.

We didn’t get to the site as ear­ly as we planned, but it still wasn’t too crowd­ed for most of our vis­it. The whole dou­ble tick­et thing is crazy — one is for the state and one is fed­er­al. Appar­ent­ly, there is no way to just have peo­ple buy one tick­et at one counter and some sort of com­put­er­ized sys­tem keep track of these things and split the mon­ey lat­er. I won­der if it is a lack of trust. That would tie into a lot of what we see as a cul­ture of intel­lec­tu­al pro­tec­tion­ism at the sci­en­tif­ic and engi­neer­ing cen­ters, where the cen­ters are hes­i­tant to work togeth­er and many times even researchers with­in the same cen­ter. Enough work talk though.

What I don’t have pic­tures of but should are the place we stayed the night before. Have to put the cam­era down sometimes…After the meh expe­ri­ence in the town of Cobá, we decid­ed to skip the town clos­est to the Chichen Itza ruins and dri­ve a lit­tle out of the way to the town of Ek Bal­am. The Lone­ly Plan­et assured us that there was an eco-lodge near the ruins there. After a few missed turns, we did find the Gen­e­sis Retreat, and it was worth the effort. This eco-lodge felt like a very spe­cial spot. The Cana­di­an own­er, who blogs here, has built a place with a vari­ety of green tech­nolo­gies includ­ing dry toi­lets and bio-fil­tered water pool, all for which I am a suck­er. A lot of eco-hotels seem no dif­fer­ent from reg­u­lar hotels, but that was not the case here. After relax­ing by the pool for the after­noon, din­ner was a won­der­ful veg­e­tar­i­an affair, and such a nice change from the usu­al. There was a chance for bed­room taran­tu­las, but no luck, only cute geck­os. :)