Birds, birds, birds. Rio Lagar­tos is anoth­er town at the end of the road, but this time on a lagoon. The area is known for bird­watch­ing, and it is anoth­er pro­tect­ed Mex­i­can bios­phere reserve. Along with Celestun, this is one of the places to find large flamin­go colonies. We didn’t see the thou­sands of flamin­gos that are some­times report­ed, but there were plen­ty and they are amaz­ing.

After a some­what uncom­fort­able night due to the heat and humid­i­ty and weak fans, it wasn’t hard to wake up and get out the door before sun­rise for our bird­ing tour. Fan­tas­tic. Def­i­nite­ly one of the high­lights, although I think you can skip the pseu­do-spa mud part and stay with the birds. I’ve tem­porar­i­ly mis­placed my sight­ing list, but some oth­er high­lights that we saw but didn’t pho­to­graph are roseate spoon­bills, par­rots, and a rap­tor.

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Pel­i­can in town

Cor­morant dry­ing out

Sun­set off the dock

Sun­rise on the way out in the morn­ing

Flamin­gos at sun­rise

One-eyed croc­o­dile

Anhin­ga

blue heron per­haps

Flamin­gos high above

The 4 flamin­gos of the apoc­a­lypse.

the lone­li­ness of the white pel­i­can

com­mon black hawk